Category Archives: Training and Mentorship

The cornerstone of JAWS’ work is training and mentorship. Often this takes place at our annual Conference and Mentorship Program (CAMP) gathering, but we also strive to provide opportunities for members to connect through regional gatherings and trainings. In addition, we also work to partner up mentors who wish to share their experience and expertise with mentees who seek to grow, advance and lead. We call this symbiosis, as mentoring is often a two-way exchange.

CAMP 2016: Books & Browse

BooksBrowseBooze1By Joanne Bamberger, Books & Browse Coordinator

Calling all JAWS authors!

Are you always on the lookout for ways to promote your recent book project or ways to connect with other authors? The JAWS Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP) is the perfect place to do that!

We authors know that promoting and selling the books we’ve written can be a full-time job, but the JAWS sisterhood can help you with that during our annual Books & Browse event. During this popular session, CAMPers can buy books by JAWS authors, meet the authors and chat with them about their latest work.

CAMP 2016: Pre-conference workshops on data journalism and freelancing

CAMP2016_preconferenceworkshopsAlong with our keynotes by Danyel Smith, cultural lead at “The Undefeated” for ESPN, and Aminda “Mindy” Marqués Gonzalez, we’ve announced two pre-conference workshops on data journalism and freelancing. The Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP) takes place from Oct. 28 to Oct. 30 at the Hotel Roanoke in Roanoke, Va. Register for the conference today.

Regional gatherings recap: February 2016

jawsnyc_roosevelthouseJAWS NYC: JAWdesses met at the Roosevelt House for an intimate tour led by Deborah Gardner. She regaled attendees with accounts of the historic events that took place at the house, with an emphasis on Eleanor Roosevelt’s life and achievements, and also led the group through the exhibit on the suffrage movement. The show is open to the public through April 2.

Regional gatherings recap: January 2016

jaws_Jennifer_masciaJAWS Bay Area: Campaign finance reporting isn’t just for political geeks. Do you cover sports or business? Who is making money from campaigns in your city or state? JAWS president Sandra Fish talked with Bay Area JAWS members about this topic recently. Read more in the members-only site.

JAWS NYC: JAWS member Tina Susman interviews Jennifer Mascia, a staff writer at The Trace, a news site dedicated to gun violence and policy. Mascia spoke about the start of the organization and her experience on the beat. Listen to the track at the members-only site.

CAMP 2015: Storytelling in this century

By Camila Osorio, 2015 JAWS Fellow

20151010_CAMP_046v2Storytelling is at the heart of good journalism. But storytelling is changing: Snapchats, podcasts and interactive graphics have quickly entered 21st century-newsrooms. Katherine Lanpher, Al Jazeera America senior online features editor, organized a panel, “Storytelling in this Century,” at JAWS CAMP to encourage women to welcome these new narrative forms instead of fear them.

Regional gatherings recap: November 2015

JAWS D.C.: Nearly 30 members of JAWS gathered at Teaism Restaurant in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29, for an exciting evening of food, fun and fellowship. The event was organized by regional co-captain Lottie Joiner and featured author Dr. Alice Driver. Driver, a JAWS member, talked about her book “More or Less Dead: Feminicide, Haunting, and the Ethics of Representation in Mexico.”

Nikki Raz also organized its first “freelancer speed-dating” event Nov. 7 designed to match people seeking to work collaboratively in order to gain new skills. Seven JAWdesses came to pitch and to listen to story ideas.

CAMP 2015: Crossing Lines: How journalists can ethically be advocates

By Casey Hynes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

On the first day of journalism school or the first day in the newsroom, journalists learn that the cardinal rule of reporting is objectivity. Letting personal biases creep into the story is a credibility-destroying mistake. The Society for Professional Journalists is clear: Journalists should report stories, not become part of them.

But Asra Nomani, author of “Standing Alone: An American Woman’s Struggle for the Soul of Islam,” believes reporters can ethically promote causes. But they must maintain their journalistic values while doing it. Nomani led a CAMP breakout session on the issue, titled “Crossing Lines: How Journalists Can Ethically Be Advocates.”

Nomani became an advocacy journalist after her friend and colleague Daniel Pearl was beheaded by Islamic militants in Karachi, Pakistan, in 2002.

CAMP 2015: S. Mitra Kalita Keynote

By Casey Hynes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

20151010_CAMP_047v3Figuring out what works — and what doesn’t — to improve diversity in news coverage and newsrooms has been key in the career of Los Angeles Times managing editor S. Mitra Kalita.

Here’s what she’s learned over her career, which includes stops at The Washington Post, Newsday, the Associated Press and Quartz: “There is no path forward for any of us until there is a space for all of us.”

CAMP 2015: Five lessons about covering sexual assault in Native communities

By Madi Alexander, 2015 JAWS Fellow

20151010_CAMP_036v2The rape and brutalization of Native American women and girls is pervasive both on and off tribal lands. At a panel on sexual violence at JAWS CAMP, five journalists shared their experiences and advice on covering these issues and understanding the context around them.

CAMP 2015: Reinventing the journalism curriculum

By Bethany Barnes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

College journalism programs are under pressure to deliver the digital journalists of the future, but effective curriculum isn’t only about teaching particular tools or platforms, according to professors discussing “Reinventing the Journalism Curriculum” at the 2015 Journalism and Women Symposium.

A computer can spew out facts — but it still can’t compete with the adept journalist when it comes to context, curiosity and critical thinking. Those fundamentals are needed no matter how the journalism is relayed to the audience, the panelists agreed.

Rachele Kanigel, Jackie Spinner, Melita Garza and Cindy Skrzycki talked about how they tackle what they think is a false conflict: The struggle between what’s been the bedrock of reporting — writing, ethics — and new technologies.

CAMP 2015: Freelance doesn’t mean free: Top ten tips from Dana E. Neuts

By Deirdre Bannon, 2015 JAWS Fellow

Dana E. Neuts (@SPJDana) presented strategies for success as a freelance journalist in her workshop, “Freelance Doesn’t Mean Free” at JAWS CAMP.

Neuts, the immediate past president of the Society of Professional Journalists, started her Seattle-based freelance writing business, Virtually Yourz, in 2003. After only 18 months, she was able to fully support herself through a combination of editorial and corporate clients.

But navigating the business side of a freelance career isn’t always easy, so Neuts shared her tricks of the trade with journalists looking to start or expand their independent journalism businesses. Her advice included how to negotiate rates and contracts, how to keep the IRS happy, and how to make sure you’re able to save for retirement. Here are the top 10 takeaways from the session.

CAMP 2015: Not On My Watch

By Bethany Barnes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

20151011_CAMP_058v2What we need to change in the culture of our newsrooms is what’s needed for all great stories: strong verbs. At the 2015 Journalism and Women Symposium plenary session “Not On My Watch,” Mary C. Curtis, an award-winning multimedia journalist, and Jill Geisler, an expert in newsroom leadership and management, encouraged the audience to view diversity as action.

CAMP 2015: 4 lessons from the ONA-Poynter Digital Women’s Leadership Academy

By Nicole Chavez, 2015 JAWS Fellow

Many women are at the forefront of digital media. Some create or produce content, others are showing leadership potential and many are already leading digital newsrooms across the United States. A diverse group of those 25 women was selected from nearly 500 applicants to attend the first Online News Association-Poynter Leadership Academy for Women in Digital Media last April.

Jane McDonnell, executive director of ONA, shared at the 2015 JAWS CAMP four important things that organizers and faculty learned during the leadership academy, which they hope will serve as a guide to improve their next seminar.

CAMP 2015: Covering race, police and communities

By Lisa Maria Garza, 2015 JAWS Fellow

Journalists who cover race and police issues in America tend to parachute into communities, focus on the loudest voices and ignore the real issue of racism, panelists discussed Saturday at JAWS.

In the aftermath of the Freddie Gray shooting, worldwide media played on loop a clip of black people looting a CVS store in Baltimore as it burned to the ground during street protests that showcased obvious tension with police, panelists and attendees said.

“No one showed the picture of people coming the next day to clean the CVS,” said Susy Schultz, outgoing JAWS vice president and Community Media Workshop president at a session titled “Covering Race, Police & Communities.”