Category Archives: Archive of Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP)

CAMP 2016: Sharing is caring

marina-villeneuve

By Marina Villeneuve, JAWS CAMP co-chair

Sharing is caring — and it’s no different at CAMP.

Whether it’s a pen during a workshop, coffees before early morning sessions or a tasty meal at a nearby diner, the annual Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP) is a time when things are freely shared.

We especially love sharing rides and hotel rooms. A list is available for those looking for a ride or a roomie, or for those with a room or car to share.

CAMP 2016: The (casual) sisterhood of CAMP

merrill_perlmanBy Merrill Perlman, JAWS Board Member

If you are coming to CAMP for the first time, don’t be nervous. We’ve got your back.

If you’re new to journalism, don’t be shy. We’ve got your back.

If you’re new to being a woman, don’t worry. We’ve got your back.

If you’ve never been to a journalism conference, don’t hyperventilate. We’ve got your back.

As nearly anyone who has been to CAMP can testify, Journalism and Women Symposium’s Conference and Mentoring Project is different.

CAMP 2016: Why CAMP matters

jessica_langloisBy Jessica Langlois, JAWS Southern California Co-Captain

I just registered for the 2016 JAWS Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP), which will be held in Roanoke, Va., Oct. 28 to 30 – and I hope you will do the same! You can check out the schedule and register here.

Here’s why CAMP matters.

My first JAWS CAMP was in 2012 in Albuquerque, N.M., and I can trace so many milestones in my career back to that weekend.

CAMP 2016: Books & Browse

BooksBrowseBooze1By Joanne Bamberger, Books & Browse Coordinator

Calling all JAWS authors!

Are you always on the lookout for ways to promote your recent book project or ways to connect with other authors? The JAWS Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP) is the perfect place to do that!

We authors know that promoting and selling the books we’ve written can be a full-time job, but the JAWS sisterhood can help you with that during our annual Books & Browse event. During this popular session, CAMPers can buy books by JAWS authors, meet the authors and chat with them about their latest work.

CAMP 2016: Pre-conference workshops on data journalism and freelancing

CAMP2016_preconferenceworkshopsAlong with our keynotes by Danyel Smith, cultural lead at “The Undefeated” for ESPN, and Aminda “Mindy” Marqués Gonzalez, we’ve announced two pre-conference workshops on data journalism and freelancing. The Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP) takes place from Oct. 28 to Oct. 30 at the Hotel Roanoke in Roanoke, Va. Register for the conference today.

CAMP 2015: Storytelling in this century

By Camila Osorio, 2015 JAWS Fellow

20151010_CAMP_046v2Storytelling is at the heart of good journalism. But storytelling is changing: Snapchats, podcasts and interactive graphics have quickly entered 21st century-newsrooms. Katherine Lanpher, Al Jazeera America senior online features editor, organized a panel, “Storytelling in this Century,” at JAWS CAMP to encourage women to welcome these new narrative forms instead of fear them.

CAMP 2015: Crossing Lines: How journalists can ethically be advocates

By Casey Hynes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

On the first day of journalism school or the first day in the newsroom, journalists learn that the cardinal rule of reporting is objectivity. Letting personal biases creep into the story is a credibility-destroying mistake. The Society for Professional Journalists is clear: Journalists should report stories, not become part of them.

But Asra Nomani, author of “Standing Alone: An American Woman’s Struggle for the Soul of Islam,” believes reporters can ethically promote causes. But they must maintain their journalistic values while doing it. Nomani led a CAMP breakout session on the issue, titled “Crossing Lines: How Journalists Can Ethically Be Advocates.”

Nomani became an advocacy journalist after her friend and colleague Daniel Pearl was beheaded by Islamic militants in Karachi, Pakistan, in 2002.

CAMP 2015: S. Mitra Kalita Keynote

By Casey Hynes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

20151010_CAMP_047v3Figuring out what works — and what doesn’t — to improve diversity in news coverage and newsrooms has been key in the career of Los Angeles Times managing editor S. Mitra Kalita.

Here’s what she’s learned over her career, which includes stops at The Washington Post, Newsday, the Associated Press and Quartz: “There is no path forward for any of us until there is a space for all of us.”

CAMP 2015: Reinventing the journalism curriculum

By Bethany Barnes, 2015 JAWS Fellow

College journalism programs are under pressure to deliver the digital journalists of the future, but effective curriculum isn’t only about teaching particular tools or platforms, according to professors discussing “Reinventing the Journalism Curriculum” at the 2015 Journalism and Women Symposium.

A computer can spew out facts — but it still can’t compete with the adept journalist when it comes to context, curiosity and critical thinking. Those fundamentals are needed no matter how the journalism is relayed to the audience, the panelists agreed.

Rachele Kanigel, Jackie Spinner, Melita Garza and Cindy Skrzycki talked about how they tackle what they think is a false conflict: The struggle between what’s been the bedrock of reporting — writing, ethics — and new technologies.

CAMP 2015: Freelance doesn’t mean free: Top ten tips from Dana E. Neuts

By Deirdre Bannon, 2015 JAWS Fellow

Dana E. Neuts (@SPJDana) presented strategies for success as a freelance journalist in her workshop, “Freelance Doesn’t Mean Free” at JAWS CAMP.

Neuts, the immediate past president of the Society of Professional Journalists, started her Seattle-based freelance writing business, Virtually Yourz, in 2003. After only 18 months, she was able to fully support herself through a combination of editorial and corporate clients.

But navigating the business side of a freelance career isn’t always easy, so Neuts shared her tricks of the trade with journalists looking to start or expand their independent journalism businesses. Her advice included how to negotiate rates and contracts, how to keep the IRS happy, and how to make sure you’re able to save for retirement. Here are the top 10 takeaways from the session.